Rob Robbins and Steve Rupp have been diving under the Antarctic sea ice for a combined 60 years. Hang around their dive headquarters at McMurdo Station and you’ll see rows of oxygen tanks, wetsuits, and breathing apparatus; above an old mulberry couch, a map labeled Ross Sea Soundings in Fathom and Feet; a Magic 8 Ball (“we consult it for anything and everything!”), Maxwell House coffee grounds, and a wall of magnetic poetry (“nuzzle me bad”). You’ll hear constant jokes like “it’s a fish-eat-fish world” while reading daunting titles on the bookshelves: Proceedings of Repetitive Diving Workshop; Man in the Sea Volumes I & II; Mixed Gas Diving; and the Antarctica Scientific Diving Manual, which includes this advice: “drilling a safety hole allows continued surface access in cases where a Weddell seal appropriates the primary dive hole.” (via Antarctica marine science: Research and artist program resume after shutdown.)

Rob Robbins and Steve Rupp have been diving under the Antarctic sea ice for a combined 60 years. Hang around their dive headquarters at McMurdo Station and you’ll see rows of oxygen tanks, wetsuits, and breathing apparatus; above an old mulberry couch, a map labeled Ross Sea Soundings in Fathom and Feet; a Magic 8 Ball (“we consult it for anything and everything!”), Maxwell House coffee grounds, and a wall of magnetic poetry (“nuzzle me bad”). You’ll hear constant jokes like “it’s a fish-eat-fish world” while reading daunting titles on the bookshelves: Proceedings of Repetitive Diving Workshop; Man in the Sea Volumes I & II; Mixed Gas Diving; and the Antarctica Scientific Diving Manual, which includes this advice: “drilling a safety hole allows continued surface access in cases where a Weddell seal appropriates the primary dive hole.” (via Antarctica marine science: Research and artist program resume after shutdown.)

[W]ry, wonderful… That Talbot is a writer gifted enough to evoke not just images but their attendant music through her words will come as no surprise to anyone who’s read her in The New Yorker or elsewhere. One of the things The Entertainer makes abundantly clear, though, is that she comes by her aesthetic sense naturally…. Talbot has woven a tale as romantic and vivid as any film could hope to be, while still seeing every bit of it plain. She is as clear-eyed about her father as she is about history—no easy feat…. [Lyle] never had even a starring role as dazzling as the one his youngest child, with history as her guide, has now written for him.
Slate on Margaret Talbot’s The Entertainer… To read the whole review, click here.
The New America Foundation’s Broadly Speaking series hosted Riverhead author Hanna Rosin and New York Times columnist Gail Collins for an incredible evening of conversation in celebration of Rosin’s forthcoming thunderbolt of a book THE END OF MEN. 
The night led to a lively debate on evolving gender roles as the two women discussed everything from equal chore distribution (spoiler alert: men still do less housework!) to why ambitious women are still viewed as “bitchy” in the workplace to the gender-neutral mecca currently known as Sweeden. 

Stay tuned for lots more buzz on this book! 

The New America Foundation’s Broadly Speaking series hosted Riverhead author Hanna Rosin and New York Times columnist Gail Collins for an incredible evening of conversation in celebration of Rosin’s forthcoming thunderbolt of a book THE END OF MEN. 

The night led to a lively debate on evolving gender roles as the two women discussed everything from equal chore distribution (spoiler alert: men still do less housework!) to why ambitious women are still viewed as “bitchy” in the workplace to the gender-neutral mecca currently known as Sweeden. 

Stay tuned for lots more buzz on this book!