livefromthenypl
livefromthenypl:

Steven Johnson’s new book, Future Perfect, hit the bookshelves today! And on October 3, Johnson will be coming to LIVE to talk about it!
Check out Maria Popova’s exploration of Future Perfect on Brain Pickings, which includes a selection of quotes from the book on the “peer progressive” movement, technology’s democratization of information, and what the Internet wants:

So what does the Internet want? It wants to lower the cost for creating and sharing information. The notion sounds unimpeachable when you phrase it like that, until you realize all the strange places that kind of affordance ultimately leads to. The Internet wants to breed algorithms that can execute thousands of financial transactions per minute, and it wants to disseminate the #occupywallstreet meme across the planet. The Internet ‘wants’ both the Wall Street tycoons and the popular insurrection at its feet.
Can that strange, contradictory cocktail drive progress on its own? Perhaps — for the simple reason that it democratizes the control of information. When information is expensive and scarce, powerful or wealthy individuals or groups have a disproportionate impact on how that information circulates. But as it gets cheaper and more abundant, the barriers to entry are lowered. This is hardly a new observation, but everything that has happened over the last twenty years has confirmed the basic insight. That democratization has not always led to positive outcomes — think of those spam artists — but there is no contesting the tremendous, orders-of-magnitude increase in the number of people creating and sharing, thanks to the mass adoption of the Internet.
—Steven Johnson, Future Perfect

livefromthenypl:

Steven Johnson’s new book, Future Perfect, hit the bookshelves today! And on October 3, Johnson will be coming to LIVE to talk about it!

Check out Maria Popova’s exploration of Future Perfect on Brain Pickings, which includes a selection of quotes from the book on the “peer progressive” movement, technology’s democratization of information, and what the Internet wants:

So what does the Internet want? It wants to lower the cost for creating and sharing information. The notion sounds unimpeachable when you phrase it like that, until you realize all the strange places that kind of affordance ultimately leads to. The Internet wants to breed algorithms that can execute thousands of financial transactions per minute, and it wants to disseminate the #occupywallstreet meme across the planet. The Internet ‘wants’ both the Wall Street tycoons and the popular insurrection at its feet.

Can that strange, contradictory cocktail drive progress on its own? Perhaps — for the simple reason that it democratizes the control of information. When information is expensive and scarce, powerful or wealthy individuals or groups have a disproportionate impact on how that information circulates. But as it gets cheaper and more abundant, the barriers to entry are lowered. This is hardly a new observation, but everything that has happened over the last twenty years has confirmed the basic insight. That democratization has not always led to positive outcomes — think of those spam artists — but there is no contesting the tremendous, orders-of-magnitude increase in the number of people creating and sharing, thanks to the mass adoption of the Internet.

—Steven Johnson, Future Perfect

  1. riverheadbooks reblogged this from livefromthenypl
  2. livefromthenypl posted this